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If you are deleting something in SharePoint 2010 and you do not see a message that states the deleted item is being sent to the Recycle Bin, neither you nor your IT department will be able to restore it once it has been deleted.​

  

Just point to the date on the calendar, and then click Add.

  

You can stay updated on changes to documents and list items on your SharePoint site by receiving notifications of changes as alerts and Really Simple Syndication (RSS)​

  

When communicating through email, adding a link to a file is more efficient than adding an email attachment. It ensures that the latest copy is being accessed and reduces network traffic and email
storage.​

  

When selecting a URL for your new site, remove spaces to ensure that your link is both shorter and less likely to break when shared via email or instant message.​

  

To change the way items in a library or list appear, sort or filter the items or create or apply a
view.​

  

A SharePoint calendar enables you to work with multiple Exchange and SharePoint calendars at the same time. For example, a group calendar is helpful when you schedule a team meeting, because you can see the Exchange calendars of team members and SharePoint calendars of resources, such as conference rooms, in one group calendar view.

For more information

  

Once an organization has installed and run SharePoint for some time, many natural tendencies are going to be noticed by users. One of these is the appearance of users that are no longer with the firm still appearing inside SharePoint groups, member lists, and various other locations. Their Active Directory profile may not show up any more; however, their SharePoint profile continues to linger on. These accounts are often termed as "dead" or "orphaned" accounts. The reason they exist when their AD account no longer exists is contributed to how SharePoint handles the creation of SharePoint profiles. SharePoint does require some form of authentication to first enter the system. This is usually an Active Directory authentication model, but can also include forms-based models, and now with the SharePoint 2010, claims-based models. Regardless of the authentication means, once a user enters the SharePoint environment, SharePoint creates a profile that is completely disjointed from the authentication model. At this point, modifications can be made to the authentication form that is not going to trickle to the SharePoint profile, this includes the deletion of unused or ‘dead’ accounts. Because SharePoint has no concept of a ‘dead’ account, there’s no native means to eliminate these accounts. If your organization experiences high-turnover; it’s recommended that a 3rd party tool be considered.

  

SharePoint offers versioning of documents and items and for document libraries we are able to have both minor and major versions. Each version of a document, both minor and major version is stored in the content database as a full version. This means that a 10MB PowerPoint presentation that has 10 versions is using 100 MB in your content database. Combine that with a number of draft versions and a lot of documents we can save much storage by limit the amount of versions.

Versioning is changed from the list settings page and Versioning.

  

Some SharePoint lists could be useful to reuse at other locations in your SharePoint environment. Customized SharePoint lists can easily be created as templates so the customized list will be available when other users are creating new lists.

You can browse the List, select the List tab in the Ribbon, and click List settings to create a template of a list in SharePoint 2010. Under Permissions and Management, you will find Save list as a template. Simply fill in a File name, Template name, description, and whether you want to include the content or not.

When you click OK, the template will be saved as a .stp file in your List Template Gallery of your site

  

Metadata navigation is a new feature in SharePoint 2010 that allows you to quickly find and filter content in large document libraries. End users will get a new navigation pane in the left-hand side navigation of the document library when they enable the Metadata navigation. The entries displayed in the pane are the columns that are specified in the Metadata Navigation settings. Clicking on any of the items in the navigation panel of the document library, you can filter the content based on your criteria.

You can enable the Metadata navigation from list settings and Metadata navigation settings. The fields that are available in the navigation are Content types, Single-value Choice Fields, and Managed Metadata Fields.

  

To embed YouTube videos on your SharePoint site, get the ‘embed video code’ from the YouTube site and copy paste into a notepad. Upload the notepad to a library. Add a content editor web part and point the content link to this notepad. This will embed the video on the SharePoint page and can be played via the SharePoint media player.

  

It would sometimes be useful to reuse a specific column and its content in lists or document libraries. For example, you may want to have a column containing a security classification in your document libraries. This can easily be achieved by using Site Columns, which are columns located at the site level that can be reused throughout your site.

Site columns are created from Site Actions -> Site settings -> Galleries ->Site columns

  

The single best way to share documents with your peers is using the "E-mail a Link" function that is built right in the Ribbon. Occasionally, your recipients do not have access to your SharePoint environment, and you need to resort to the old-fashioned route by emailing these email attachments.

Below is a two-step process that lets you sends documents that are stored in SharePoint directly via Microsoft Outlook.

1. Navigate to the designated Document Library. Click on Library > Connect to Outlook.

2. After a series of prompts, the documents will be added to the "SharePoint Lists" in Outlook. You can now preview and forward these documents as attachments without first having to download them.

  

It would sometimes be useful to reuse a specific column and its content in lists or document libraries. For example, you may want to have a column containing a security classification in your document libraries. This can easily be achieved by using Site Columns, which are columns located at the site level that can be reused throughout your site.

Site columns are created from Site Actions -> Site settings -> Galleries ->Site columns

  

The out-of-the-box search results page renders a physical page on the SharePoint Server 14 hive.  This page is not easily customized.  Instead, create a new search center site which generates the search results page in the pages library that can be easily customized by adding or removing web parts.  The search settings should be modified to direct the search results to this page. 

  
For an Intranet, determining key company metrics and showing them graphically can help keep staff focused on the same goals. SharePoint provides a Key Performance Indicator (KPI) web part which is set up by default in a site created using the Reports template. This web part is also available in other site templates such as Team / Collaboration.
Setup a KPI list and a data source such as Excel, a SharePoint list or any external data source to hold your metric data, then create the KPI itself. By default, this can be used with a Green/Yellow/Red indicator for a quick view of whether company metrics are on track.
  

About to jump on a plane, but still have work to do on that proposal?  Not a problem with SharePoint Workspace.  Simply, go to the document library you are working on, click the Library tab in the Ribbon and then click the Sync to SharePoint Workspace button.  After a few short moments, you'll have a copy of every file in your document library that is available for reading and editing.  You are then free to catch your flight and make revisions to that proposal in mid-air.  When you have a connection to your SharePoint server again, SharePoint Workspace will automatically sync your changes back into the document on your server.  It will also update your local copy with any changes other have made.  SharePoint Workspace is a great way to work with files when you're on the go.

  

Documents are not always created in the location where they should finally be routed to.  For example, documents may be created in one site but routed to a different site for final review by clients or customers. 

This can be easily achieved in SharePoint 2010 via simple short cut menus that can be set up for a document library. This is done by enabling the content organizer features and configuring ‘send to’ connections from central administration.  This connection will then appear for all documents in a document library for the configured site.  Easily write content organization rules for the drop library to route the document to its final destination.

  
SharePoint offers versioning of documents and items and for document libraries we are able to have both minor and major versions. Each version of a document, both minor and major version is stored in the content database as a full version. This means that a 10MB PowerPoint presentation that has 10 versions is using 100 MB in your content database. Combine that with a number of draft versions and a lot of documents we can save much storage by limit the amount of versions.

Versioning is changed from the list settings page and Versioning.
  
Categorizing content helps users effectively find documents within the site. This can be done via SharePoint through the use of custom columns or meta data. Create these columns at the global level of the site collection and add them to the required content types. The document libraries or lists associated with these content types will then inherit these custom columns.

These custom columns can also be set as required fields. For example, you may include a column identifying the Sales Territory a document is related to, making it easier for the Sales staff to filter their search results quickly by their relevant territory. This also improves the ranking of the search results.
  

Some SharePoint lists could be useful to reuse at other locations in your SharePoint environment. Customized SharePoint lists can easily be created as templates so the customized list will be available when other users are creating new lists.

You can browse the List, select the List tab in the Ribbon, and click List settings to create a template of a list in SharePoint 2010. ,. Under Permissions and Management, you will find Save list as a template. Simply fill in a File name, Template name, description, and whether you want to include the content or not.

When you click OK, the template will be saved as a .stp file in your List Template Gallery of your site.

  

Documents are not always created in the location where they should finally be routed to.  For example, documents may be created in one site but routed to a different site for final review by clients or customers. 

This can be easily achieved in SharePoint 2010 via simple short cut menus that can be set up for a document library. This is done by enabling the content organizer features and configuring ‘send to’ connections from central administration.  This connection will then appear for all documents in a document library for the configured site.  Easily write content organization rules for the drop library to route the document to its final destination.

  

Categorizing content helps users effectively find documents within the site. This can be done via SharePoint through the use of custom columns or meta data. Create these columns at the global level of the site collection and add them to the required content types. The document libraries or lists associated with these content types will then inherit these custom columns.

These custom columns can also be set as required fields. For example, you may include a column identifying the Sales Territory a document is related to, making it easier for the Sales staff to filter their search results quickly by their relevant territory. This also improves the ranking of the search results.

  

SharePoint offers versioning of documents and items and for document libraries we are able to have both minor and major versions. Each version of a document, both minor and major version is stored in the content database as a full version. This means that a 10MB PowerPoint presentation that has 10 versions is using 100 MB in your content database. Combine that with a number of draft versions and a lot of documents we can save much storage by limit the amount of versions.

Versioning is changed from the list settings page and Versioning.

  

If you have permission to add Web Parts to your site, you can add the Site Users Web Part to display all the people and groups
who have access to the site.

 

 

  

You should check out a document only if you want to make sure that no one else can change it until you check it back in. If you want to collaborate on a document, do not check it out.​

  

Whether your organization already has an existing SharePoint implementation in place, or you are pursuing a new implementation, the overall strategy of a successful SharePoint 2007 deployment needs to be approached in a very unique manner.

SharePoint 2007, (Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 (WSS) and Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS)), offers a broad array of solutions. To properly discern the solutions you are looking for – and subsequently, the platform you need - you must first step back and take a look at the big picture. Ask yourself: "What do I need this platform to deliver, from a business perspective?" This process helps you understand what your concrete goals are, and how these goals will add true business value to the organization. Something I do diligently - through my organization, EPCGroup.net - is work with our client’s IT staff and executive teams to discern where SharePoint can add tangible, measurable value. Can it replace other existing systems? Are there software licensing costs associated with disparate legacy systems that can be saved through the implementation of SharePoint? What technologies is the organization utilizing for Enterprise Content Management, web-based collaboration, and the company Intranet? Can these technologies be replaced by SharePoint at less cost and with better results?

Part of this process involves the development of a SharePoint "Business-Value Case" or "Road Map" for your organization.

I always wonder why a given organization would spend $2-3 million yearly for licensing and maintenance costs on a Documentum or LiveLink environment that is user-unfriendly, hard to customize, and significantly more expensive than a SharePoint Enterprise Content Management solution. Even though I am a somewhat biased SharePoint consultant, this baffles me on a daily basis. After two years, the organization would have spent $4 million on a Documentum or LiveLink environment, but still $500,000 on a SharePoint ECM solution. I would not just throw numbers out there like this if I hadn’t literally seen this over and over again. That is real business value and cost savings within your organization.

Why does this happen at organizations all over the country? In truth, it is not management, or even the executive sponsor’s fault, considering Microsoft did not offer much in the way of "dynamic functionality" with their SharePoint 2003 release, and these costly "500 pound gorilla" solutions were really all that was available. Thankfully, that is not the case anymore, and now it’s time to start seriously considering SharePoint 2007 as a means to cost savings and adding value to your organization.

 

SharePoint 2007 delivers a level of ease and functionality (specifically with regard to adding custom workflows and automating business processes) that are not approached by other solutions. Supplement these functionalities with the potential business value of utilizing an external security model to your SharePoint 2007 implementation - to open the platform to partners, customers, vendors, or employees from other business units – and you really start seeing some potential. With SharePoint 2007, you can have one software platform, support skill set, physical hardware model, backup and disaster recovery solution, and governed "look and feel" that can replace so many costly and disparate solutions that it quickly makes real business sense and can actually add to your organization’s bottom line.

  

Posted: 05 Aug 2008 06:47 PM CDT

Other developers always ask me this, and it is a very common question in the forums. Many people argue that there is no danger in read only access. So for future referance, here is the Microsoft article that describes the issue, and an extract from it. (My thanks to Shane Young who sent me the link lately and reminded me where is was).

"customers are strongly advised against direct access in a read-only manner to these databases unless Microsoft protocol documentation is followed exactly. Accessing these databases programmatically or manually could cause unexpected locking within Microsoft SQL Server that can result in overall performance problems."

  

Here is one for anyone who ever wondered why a certain field is not showing up in the "Group By" selection box.

You know how you can define in the field definition if the field is "sortable" and "filterable"? Well, what about "groupable"? its not an option! But still, some fields don't show up in the dropdown for grouping in the view settings dialog. How is that set?
The answer is in the aspx file ViewNew.aspx (and ViewEdit.aspx) - these files have server side scripts that has a function "IsGroupable". This function checks if the field should be displayed in the list of fields that you can group by.
Here are the rules:

  1. If the fiels is not "sortable", then it is not groupable
  2. If the field is hidden, then it is not groupable
  3. If the field is set not to display in viewforms, then it is not groupable
  4. If the field is a lookup field and is set to display related items, then it is not groupable
  5. If the field is the built-in file name field, then it is not groupable.
From the list above you can see that it is pretty logical...except #3! Heck! A lot of times you dont want to display the field in views, but you still want to group by it!

So, here you go. If you were puzzled why your field was not showing up - now you know.

Here is the code

protected bool IsGroupable(SPField field)
{
 if (!field.Sortable ||
  !ShowField(field) ||
  ((field as SPFieldLookup) != null && (field as SPFieldLookup).CountRelated))
 {
  return false;
 }
 if (iBaseType == SPBaseType.DocumentLibrary
  && (field.InternalName == "FileLeafRef"
      || field.InternalName == "LinkFilenameNoMenu"
      || field.InternalName == "LinkFilename"
      || field.InternalName == "NameOrTitle"))
 {
  return false;
 }
 return true;
}

  

Here's a quick tip: If you want to add more Content Editor Web Parts faster to a homepage or a webpart page (to move and edit them afterwards)

1. Switch to edit mode
2. Add a Content Editor Web Part
3. When the page reloads with a CEWP added, hit Refresh (F5) and click "Retry" when Internet Explorer asks you if to resubmit information.

I use this technique to add multiple CEWPs to the page, when I need to add some explanations above some webparts. When I have enough of

  


When customizing the look and feel of a SharePoint site, you may find yourself needing to make tweaks to individual pages. One instance where I ran into this was while theming an internal site; I was asked to turn the Quick Launch links into drop caps (bumping up the first letter sizes) just for the home page and nowhere else on the site. This can be a royal pain to deal with on a page by page basis, especially if it involves modifying built-in UI elements that you can't tweak on the server.

 

The Content Editor Web Part comes to the rescue by enabling you to inject a <style> blob for a specific page. Since it's inline, these styles take precedence over the CSS files linked by SharePoint, so you can override the default look and feel to your heart's content. And by setting the Content Editor's border style to None, the Web Part itself will be hidden from view... all the user will see are the effects of your <style> tag.

See:  jasonmauer.com website for details

This example Web Part uses this technique to turn a vanilla SharePoint site into jasonmauer.com fanboy land. The page logo (the little house) is hidden, the banner area is adjusted and given background imagery, the silly "Quick Launch" text on the side is removed, and the title text is scooted to fit. All of this is accomplished with a few CSS overrides of the default SharePoint styles. And since the Content Editor is built-in, deployment is a snap... just import the customized .dwp file.

  
The Content Editor Web Part is your ticket back to HTML land while in the realm of a Web Part Page. It's quick, flexible, and doesn't require compiling, a custom assembly, or registering as a safe control (since it already is). Add it, edit the HTML source, and export to a .dwp... voila, a custom Web Part ready to deploy.
  

A document library can be opened in Windows Explorer mode using the Actions menu.  It is also helpful to set this mode as a Windows Mapped Drive for document libraries that are used frequently.  This allows you to use Windows Explorer without even starting in SharePoint to easily navigate to the document library and take advantage of the Explorer features such as drag/drop or creating new folders.
Copy the full URL to the document library.  For a document library called ‘Process Library’ at the top level site, the URL will be something like this: http://xxxx.com/Proposal Library/Forms/AllItems.aspx.   
 
 
Remove any ‘ ’ special characters and also remove the /Forms/AllItems.aspx from the URL.  Create a Mapped Network Drive and copy the formatted URL ‘http://xxxx.com/Proposal Library’. 
 
 
Provide the credentials during logon and make sure that ‘Reconnect at Logon’ is checked. 


 
  

If you plan on moving files from a network share into a document library, try to keep the same folder layout.  Replicating the same layout will help the user better transition to using the document library and will also help you replicate the file permissions inside of SharePoint more quickly.

 
  
Do you need to combine links to other documents or sites in your document library?  I can help you do this.

Yes. An option I like to use is the Link to Document content type.

In your bookshelf library, go to Settings, Document Library Settings. Click the link on the resulting page for Advanced Settings. Toggle the Allow managemant of content types option to Yes and click OK.

You’ll now be back in the settings of the document library and it’ll look a bit different. In the Content Types section, click the link for Add from existing content types. In the drop down box, select Document Content Types and move the Link to Document content type into the right hand box and click OK.

Navigate back to the item view of your document library. Click the down arrow on the new ment and select Link to document. This brings up an interface to add a hyperlink and a description. This can refer to an internal Sharepoint URL or an external URL and will be included in the document library.

This allows for you to link to external content or link to a master copy of an internal document without replicating content.

  
  

SharePoint uses permission levels to function as roles within the SharePoint environment. Examples of these roles include "Read", "Full Control", "Design" and several others. Each role groups a variety of permissions together. When the role has been assigned to an account, it dictates the level of authority the account has on the object. At each site level, additional permission levels can be created and made available for assignment. Likewise, each existing permission level can be customized. Although this level of customization can be helpful for a free/open collaboration environment, many environments can also experience a level of frustration when trying to enforce governance and policies for their infrastructure. Knowing what permission levels are available for user assignment is a critical step in maintaining a firm level of security to your SharePoint environment.

  


Controlling the availability of permission levels within the environment can help insure better success in maintaining SharePoint compliance with set governance or policies. Not controlling the standardization and availability of these roles can lead to such issues as large and non-objective taxonomies, accidental access to sensitive materials and much more. Help head these issues off with a little bit of planning and ingenuity. First, take a long look at the out-of-box permission levels; make sure you include looking at the corresponding actions with the identified roles. Then decide which ones are applicable to the goals of SharePoint and the various roles that need to be available to meet those goals. Tag ones that don’t apply for removal. Identify those that need to be modified. Compose new ones that need to be added. To insure a consistency across the board, apply these permission levels to site definitions. This will help insure newly created sites will use the set criteria for permission levels.

  

Role inheritance is a factor that very few folks remember to consider. A role is simply another name for a permission level. Permission levels are a grouping of SharePoint permissions combined together under a name such as Contribute, Read, Full Control, etc. These are then assigned to users to enable access to a site, list, or item. The caveat to this is that permission levels (roles) are customizable at every site level. Sites that have unique permissions first receive a "copy" of the parent sites permission levels. At this point, the permission levels can be changed, new ones can be added, and some may even be removed. This means that any changes or additions made to a parent sites’ permission level will not trickle down to the child site with unique permissions. Likewise; adjustments and changes made at a child sites permission levels may go undetected at the parent site level.

  

Permissions inheritance in SharePoint simply refers to how an object in SharePoint is receiving security. An object such as a site, list or item, can be said to have inherited permissions when it uses the same permissions as its parent object. For example, a document inheriting security is using the same permissions that have been applied to its parent document library. When an object is said to have "unique" permissions, its security is unique or separate from the parent object. For example, a document with unique security has separate permissions from the parent library. Changes to the parent object will NOT affect the child and likewise, changes at the child level will NOT affect the parent object. With this, considering security in SharePoint becomes very complex. To get a true and complete picture of how someone has access to an environment, every site, subsite, list/library, folder, and item will need to be evaluated

  

Knowing how security inheritance works can greatly simplify your SharePoint management. SharePoint opens the door to allow collaboration and team efforts to be focused on more sensitive materials. This can be accomplished through the use of unique security on that object. That unique security can better insure only the individuals that are privileged to work with the information can access it. You can check to see if an object is inheriting permissions looking at the permission settings of that object. At the site, list, and item level; you’ll see an inheritance message found under the permission settings. Being able to take any sort of actions on permissions can also indicate that you have an object with unique security.

There is a "gotcha" to keep in mind when working with SharePoint inheritance. If an individual that has rights to a child object with unique security, then the rights are removed from a parent object, SharePoint will remove permissions to that child object as well.